Resident Q&A

Jeremy and Jordan, residents in the Class of 2021, reflect on some serious and silly aspects of their teaching journey.

  1. WHAT MADE YOU WANT TO BECOME A TEACHER?
    JEREMY: Before MTR, I worked for five years as a youth minister. In those five years, I was able to see the impact that positive adult presence can have in the lives of teenagers. It reminded me of the many mentor figures I’ve had throughout my life. I wanted to find an opportunity to leverage my time and my impact and be that for others — teaching was the natural next step.

    JORDAN: I wanted to become a teacher because students need to receive Christ’s love. I wanted to be someone who supports and cares for them in each aspect of their lives. I also wanted to shape their character and values for the rest of their life. My students simply need a good, quality education, and I wanted to do my best to help provide that for them. 
  1. WHAT’S A FUNNY MOMENT YOU’VE SHARED WITH ONE OR MORE STUDENTS THIS YEAR?
    JEREMY: My students are a loving bunch, always excited to give a compliment to their teachers and classmates. (It’s the best!) These compliments are most often directed towards my mentor teacher, whose changing hairstyles are a favorite topic of discussion among our girls. One day, I guess the guys wanted a share of the fun: After a recent haircut, one student pointed out to the class: “So, are we not going to speak on Mr. Griffin’s recent haircut?” Jest or not, the compliments were well received.

    JORDAN: I have had so many funny moments this year. But, a more recent one is, the day we came back from winter break, I glanced at all my students, and noticed one was sitting on the toilet learning my lesson. I quickly kicked her out of my class until she was done. (I do allow my students to go to the bathroom, I think she simply forgot she was at virtual school).
  1. WHERE HAVE YOU FOUND SOLACE THIS YEAR?
    JEREMY: In a time defined by hours in front of the laptop, I have found solace in taking time to unplug. My favorite window of time every day is the hour or so after the workday—before I begin on any lesson planning or homework. I light a candle, play some music, and chat with my wife about the school day, sharing victories and lots of funny stories. That time has taught me the importance of slowing down—even if just for an hour—and taking a break.

    JORDAN: I have found solace in going on walks outside this year, whether that be during my lunch break, or after school. Getting my body up, and moving and being reminded how big God is through his creation has been great for my mental and emotional health this year.